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The Longevity Revolution
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This site is a resource on new dimensions to later life. It highlights research that challenges long-held beliefs about ageing and generates a positive attitude to living longer.

The Longevity Revolution: Later life - Is it a movable feast?  How much is genetic? Or is it down to lifestyle choices, motivation and attitudes?

There is growing awareness that ‘active ageing’, social engagement and community participation can radically alter for the better how later life is experienced. The challenge for society is to make these things happen.

Cost of ageing population 'needs re-calculating'. BBC news (10/09/10).

Traditionally the old-age dependency ratio, OADR (the number of people aged over 65 to people of working age), was used to assess the burden to the society of supporting elderly people. The increase of that ratio was considered to reflect the growing burden of the ageing population on the pensions system. But this measure is now out of date because people live longer and someone at age 65 is not an old person anymore.The same problem occurs if policy-makers use the old-age dependency ratio as an indicator of the burden of ageing on health care costs.

View clips from documentary - The Boomer Century: 1946–2046 hosted by Ken Dychtwald, one of the leading American thinkers on the 'Age Wave'.

'Use it and grow it'. A brain that is being stretched is building cognitive reserve. Read about the concept of Cognitive Reserve on SharpBrains.


Cost of ageing needs re-evaluation

Traditionally the old-age dependency ratio, OADR (the number of people aged over 65 to people of working age), was used to assess the burden to the society of supporting elderly people. The increase of that ratio was considered to reflect the growing burden of the ageing population on the pensions system. But this measure is now out of date, say the authors of the study, because people live longer and someone at age 65 is not an old person anymore.The same problem occurs if policy-makers use the old-age dependency ratio as an indicator of the burden of ageing on health care costs.